Google+
 
 
 

Fresh and cool: Top five iced drinks for summer

While we’re in the grip of a British heatwave, you might be looking for something a bit cooler than a cup of coffee mid-morning. Here are our top five favourite icy recipes to cool you down and pep you up.

1. Iced caramel latte

You’ll need:

  •  100ml of strong, fresh, good quality coffee
  • 1 tablespoon caramel syrup
  • 1 tablespoon white sugar, or to taste
  • 200ml skimmed milk
  • 10 ice cubes
  • 2 tablespoons whipped cream (optional)

What to do:

Put the coffee, caramel syrup and sugar into a blender and pulse until the sugar is dissolved. Put the ice in a plastic bag, wrap the bag in a tea towel and put it on a chopping board. Hit the bundle with a rolling pin to break up the ice a bit, then add it to the blender. Add the milk, and pulse in short burst until the ice is as crushed as you’d like it. Pour into a tall glass, and top with cream if using.

2. Homemade lemonade

There’s nothing quite like the taste of real lemonade. Experiment with oranges and limes as well to make your own St Clements punch – oranges will require less sugar, and limes more.

You’ll need:

  • 6 large lemons, organic if possible
  • About 150g granulated sugar.

What to do:

Wash the lemons thoroughly in warm water and dry them on kitchen towel. Using a potato peeler, scrape the zest from three lemons, taking care to take as little of the white pith as possible.  Squeeze all the lemons, put the zest in a large, heatproof bowl and add the juice. Pour in 1.5 litres of boiling water and the sugar and leave to cool overnight.

3. Apple, beetroot and ginger superjuice

If you’re not a beetroot fan, don’t be put off! The beetroot gives this juice a subtle sweet taste and a very pretty purple colour, while the ginger adds a fresh, zingy kick. This juice should be drunk immediately it’s made, as if you try to store it the juice will separate and the flavour won’t be as good.

You’ll need (per person):

  • 1 juicy eating apple, such as ripe Golden Delicious or Cox
  • 1 cooked pre-packed beetroot with no added vinegar
  • 1/2 piece of fresh ginger
  • 100ml chilled apple juice
What to do:
Peel and core the apple and cut it into pieces. Roughly chop the beetroot, and peel and finely chop the ginger. Put everything in a blender, and pulse until smooth. Add the apple juice, pulse briefly to combine then drink immediately.

4. Chilled peppermint tea

If the mint in your herb garden is running riot over the summer, then this is the drink for you. Peppermint is a natural coolant, the fresh taste is reviving on a hot day. If you still have mint left over, cut the stalks, hang them up to dry, store in airtight containers and use them for hot tea during the winter.
You’ll need:
  • 3 stalks of peppermint leaves
  • 250ml boiling water
  • sugar or honey to taste
What to do:
  • Rinse the leaves while they’re still attached to the stalk, then strip them. Crush them a bit between your hands to release the essential oils.
  • Let the water cool slightly until it’s just off the boil.
  • Put the leaves into a teapot or straight into a mug, and add the water. Let it steep for five to ten minutes (fresh leaves need to steep longer than dried, as the flavour is less concentrated.) Sweeten to taste.
  • Strain, and allow to cool, the chill in the fridge until required.
  • Serve over ice with an extra sprig of mint on the side.

5. Peach punch

How to make peach punch drink
(Photo: Shutterstock)

This light, summery drink is ideal for a party.
You’ll need (to serve four):
  • 100g sugar
  • 410g tin of peaches in juice
  • 100ml lemon juice
  • 1 litre bottle ginger ale
  • Sprigs of fresh mint
What to do:
Put the tinned peaches in a blender with a little water and pulse until smooth. Alternatively, pass them through a sieve. Add the sugar and lemon juice and mix until smooth. Put into a jug or pitcher and add the ginger ale, mint and ice cubes. Stir before pouring.

By Sara Walker

By .

 
 
All rights reserved 2009-2016. All content copyright © FreshDesignBlog.
 
Blog Widget by LinkWithin Google